Broadway Grosses w/e 2/11/2018: Ok, now that THAT’s over.

The following are the Broadway grosses for the week ending February 11, 2018.
The Broadway grosses are courtesy of The Broadway League
Read more here:

Broadway Grosses w/e 2/4/2018: The Patriots aren’t the only ones who lost last week

The following are the Broadway grosses for the week ending February 4, 2018.
The Broadway grosses are courtesy of The Broadway League
Read more here:

Which Broadway show would you rather invest in?

“So . . . who’s in it?”

This is the most common question I get whenever I’m raising money for a Broadway show . . .  whether I’m talking to a new Broadway Investor or a seasoned angel.

And it’s a good question.

But it’s not a great question.

When I’m evaluating a Broadway Investment opportunity, I have a very specific due diligence process that I go through to rate the risk of the production.  Because all opportunities carry risk . . . including walking down the street.  The real question is how risky is each opportunity . . . and what’s the upside?   (Is there a Pinkberry across that street???)

And the “Who” in this moneyball-like equation is a factor, for sure, but it’s not the most important one.

So when I get this question these days, I usually return the question with a question.

“Let me ask you,” I say, “Which of these Broadway shows would you rather have invested in:  Hamilton, Dear Evan Hansen, Come From Away, Rent, Les Miserables, Phantom of the Opera, A Chorus Line, etc . . . or . . . INSERT NAME OF STAR-DRIVEN VEHICLE HERE.”

Who’s in a show may give an investor some comfort when a show is launched, but since all shows carry risk, and since the upside on star vehicles can be so limited thanks to the shorter runs and the higher salaries, the savvy investors go drilling for the real oil, which isn’t located in Star Town.

The gushers aren’t dependent on stars.  In those cases, which are the ones we all want, the ones that send out double-digit distribution checks every month, the show is the only star.

So the next time you’re raising money, remind your prospect that having Madonna in your show may make it easier for them to write a check, but it will mean they won’t get many back.

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For more on raising money for Broadway shows, check out my course, Raise It . . . which is not FREE when you join TheProducersPerspectivePRO.com.

 

 

Miss Daddy Long Legs? It’s baaaaaack!

Remember that time we live streamed Daddy Long Legs, and it was the first ever Broadway or Off Broadway show to get that digital treatment . . . ever?

And remember when over 150,000 people tuned in from over 130 countries around the world?

If you were one of the folks that missed it, or if you saw it on the live stream or live-live at my theater and just miss that super-sweet musical (and the amazing performances from real-life married couple (and now new parents!) Megan McGinnis and Adam Halpin), guess what …we’ve brought it back for you.

The folks at BroadwayHD were fans of the live stream, so they reached out and made it possible for you to see it on their network (big props to Stewart Lane and Bonnie Comley for adding us to their catalog and building BroadwayHD in the first place).

And it’s available NOW.

Click here to see it.

And for you theater companies out there . . . after you watch it, I have a feeling you’ll want to DO it (it’s 2 people, a unit set, and features a gorgeous score by Paul Gordon and a Drama Desk Award-winning book by John Caird), click here for info on how to perform it in your town . . . because (insert trumpet sounds), the rights are now fully available all over the world!

Enjoy it on HD.


Want to learn how to get your show from the page to the stage? Join my community of theater professionals on TheProducersPerspectivePRO, plus get instant access to 30+ hours of training, monthly newsletters and networking opportunities, producer contact lists, and so much more! To join TheProducersPerspectivePROclick here!

What George Costanza taught me about marketing.

Syndication.

It’s the stock and amateur of the television industry.  The shows keep running and running on various other networks, long after the original has “closed.”

I caught one of my favorite episodes of Seinfeld in syndication last night, and not only did I laugh so hard I had club soda coming through my nose (I’ve given up Coke!), I also got a great reminder of how to come up with a great marketing idea in the 21st Century.

Maybe you’ve seen the episode.  It’s the one where George Costanza (played by Broadway baby and the director of a show I’ve got coming up, Mr. Jason Alexander) realizes that all of his gut instincts are . . . well, wrong . . . and they just keep getting him into trouble.

So, in an effort to change his destiny, he decides to do the opposite of what his brain tells him to do first.

And, wouldn’t you know it, but money, respect, women, and so much more, fall into his lap the moment he rejects his first instinct and goes with the opposite.

The “opposite” exercise is something I do for marketing all the time.  See, first instincts are usually “easy” instincts.  They are at the top of your mind, which generally means they are the road more traveled, and they are what everyone, including your competitors, will do.

When faced with a decision about marketing, or when trying to come up with a unique marketing idea for my shows, I ask myself, “What would my competitors do?” And then I do the opposite.

You can choose to jump on the bandwagon of the common, easy choice . . . and hey, if you’ve got enough marketing dollars or some super-sized brand . . . that might just work.

But if you’re looking to stand out, then Do The Costanza.

 

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